1. Rachel Rutherford
  2. General Discussion
  3. Friday, 08 December 2017
  4.  Subscribe via email
Ok, so I finally found some time to go through roughly 200 of my Lincoln Wheat pennies I've had for quite some time. While doing through them I came across what appears to he a lamination error on a 1944 both front and back. While looking At it I noticed what appears to be a number 8 towards the top of the letter N on the word cents. It also looks as though so
Lincoln is sporting a pretty weird collar on his nice suit jacket. Almost like part of a building or something. I'm not sure if this would be considered a minor or major malfunction coin/error. I'm not the person that feels an early retirement is coming up I'm fairly a pessimist so you won't hurt my feelings by telling me that my penny is worth just that, a penny. I would have just asked my father about it seeing as he's been a collector since he was a kid and has some AMAZING coins to look at but, he's not around so here I am. But I certainly appreciate the assistance you could give me to tell me anything you could about it.


I'm a single mom and Christmas is coming up so I would love to hear that it's gonna be an amazing Christmas BUT with that said, I'm not so sure I could part with a coin for materialistic bullshit that only gives me or the kids a couple weeks of satisfaction as apposed to the feeling of having something that not everybody gets to say they have. An amazing part of history to he completely honest. But man, so many of the new generations just don't see the value in a penny anymore, not even one that nobody else has.

Thank you,
Rachel




PicsArt_12-07-03.03.01.jpg
Attachments (2)
Responses (21)
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hello, Rachel --

Wow, I love your sentiments on the penny and the piece you possibly have. I think this might be a lamination error based on the metal disfluencies. I recommend getting a second opinion from die variety and error expert John Wexler just to make sure. Here is his info: http://doubleddie.com/

I'm hoping this is a real lamination error and not just post-Mint damage/porosity (I don't think it's post-Mint damage but we need to make sure!).

If it's the Real McCoy, such pieces are generally worth about $10 and up.

And, as you say, Lincoln wheat cents have become extremely scarce in circulation since the late '70s/early '80s. Finding a 1941 wheat cent is what hooked me on the hobby 25 years ago and I hope many others enjoy making these discoveries. You certainly do, and I'm happy you find the intangible value in looking for old coins like this.

I hope you and your kids have a very Merry Christmas and that circumstances look up for you guys in the coming year.

All my best,
Josh @ CoinValues
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 1
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Thank you very much Josh. I could update you if you would like as soon as I hear back from him concerning this cent. Just let me know how you would like for me to get back to you on this. Been going through my barber dimes, quarters and all today. I did get some better pictures of it today, as well as one that I'm thinking looks more like a DAD error coin. I don't remember the year but it looks to have some doubling on the t and e in the word Cent.

I didn't even think about the different metals on the coin actually lol. It's just so late that my brain seems to be exhausted and ready for bed already.

Rachel:)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 2
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hello, Rachel --

Oh, yes -- please update me on what you find out about the cent. Please feel free to message me here!

Would you please upload a photograph of the suspected DAD error? Maybe we'll be able to tell through the photo what's going on with it...

Have a great weekend!
Josh
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 3
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
1981 Kennedy half dollar with a lot of doubling on the words half dollar. Whatcha think?
Attachments (1)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 4
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Pic
Attachments (1)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 5
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Pic
Attachments (1)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 6
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Sorry, I'm not sure how to upload with all pictures in one reply.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 7
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Another pic of the back in different lighting. PicsArt_12-09-12.40.52.jpg
Attachments (1)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 8
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Front
Attachments (1)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 9
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hi, Rachel --

Here's a link to the attributed Kennedy half dollar doubled dies: http://doubleddie.com/919455.html

I definitely see doubling on this Kennedy half dollar but I don't have the numismatic authority to officially attribute it. I suggest sending this photo on to John Wexler or the folks at CONECA to ensure it is NOT just machine doubling and, if it is an actual doubled die, to attribute it as such.

John Wexler: http://doubleddie.com/
CONECA: http://varietyvista.com/

Fingers crossed!
Josh
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 10
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Putting a few coins up here for you.
Attachments (2)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 11
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hi, Rachel --

This is a 1992 Wide AM -- the more common variety. On the 1992 Close AM, the bottoms of the "A" and "M" in "AMERICA" appear to be nearly touching.

Keep searching!
Josh
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 12
Shannon Rowland Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
1992 D close AM penny...can you please confirm? IMG_20171213_153408.jpg
Attachments (1)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 13
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hi, Shannon --

This is a fairly fuzzy image, but from the gap I see between the "A" and "M" in "AMERICA" I'm pretty confident from this image alone that this is NOT a 1992 Close AM.

Wishing you the best of luck in finding one soon!

Cheers,
Josh
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 14
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hello, Rachel --

I do see potential doubling there; may I see the rest of the coin's obverse ("head's side";) design to look for other die diagnostics?

What year Susan B. Anthony dollar do you have? I seem to see only the reverse ("tail's side";)...

Here's more info on your 1921 silver dollar: https://coinvalues.com/morgan-silver-dollar/1921

As for the other coins, we focus only on U.S. coins, and my expertise is extremely limited with those pieces. I suggest posting the photos on an ancient/medieval coin website for more info on those. Here's a really good one you might find helpful: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/

Happy New Year!
Josh
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 16
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
And what about this one? The first picture I think is the one you asked for the other side. I say I think because it's right next to the other pictures of it lol.

This second coin has me thinking it's not PMD that is going on with it.
Attachments (4)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 17
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Hi, Rachel --

It's difficult to say for sure in a photo if this is lamination, but it looks like it might be. One thing I suggest doing to definitely rule out PMD (such as adhesive residue) is to carefully apply acetone to the surface for a few minutes and see if the aberration rubs off. It it doesn't, it might be worthy of sending to a certification company or variety expert for attribution.

Best wishes,
Josh @ CoinValues
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 18
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Ok, it won't hurt the coin?

Rachel
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 19
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Moderator
Great question, but no -- acetone IS safe for coins and should remove only any residues or other surface debris.

Happy New Year!
Josh
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 20
Rachel Rutherford Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
What causes the lines on the outside of this coin? Between the lettering and the rim. I'm posting you a couple more pictures let me know what you find on them? These are from an uncirculated coins. Just not sure if I'm seeing doubling on one of them. The one that's darker on the obverse is the one with the lines (is it due to clash?).
Attachments (6)
  1. more than a month ago
  2. General Discussion
  3. # 21


There are no replies made for this post yet.
However, you are not allowed to reply to this post.